Resentment – When We Idolise Our Anger, and How to Overcome It

It has been said that ‘hate’ is a strong word. So, is there some other emotion that could better describe the way you feel toward something or someone else?

To hate someone means to exhibit hostility in their presence. On the other hand, resentment involves showing similar behaviours of disgust, albeit more discreetly. In fact, a person who harbours resentment may be more depressed about it, and the feelings of anger that come with it are more likely to be internalised than projected.

You can’t so easily hate a person, especially if it is regarding someone closest to you. But it is easier to resent a person. Even the strongest of bonds you have with someone else can be strained with resentment.

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Venting Frustrations, When Anger Takes Over

Anger. While it is not the easiest emotion to harbour, it is surely among the most tempting to give into. Why is it, that you ask? We feel angry because it helps us to regulate pain.

It is always easier to get angry than to get hurt.

Whenever you feel angry, you must allow the emotion to flow. The best way out of an emotion is to simply feel it.

With that being said, you shouldn’t dwell on the feeling any longer than you have to. The problem when we focus solely on our anger and its triggering events is that it intensifies, and it gets to the point of getting annoying.

This brings us to a whole new other level of anger: frustration. Anger manifests into frustration when we get upset or annoyed by how prolonging we find our situations to be. By dwelling on it, we’ve essentially ingrained the emotion into our subconscious minds.

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